Articles by admin

Season’s Greetings from Pilpintuwasi!

Pedro Bello was one of the first animals to arrive in Pilpintuwasi over 10 years ago. Gudrun found a wooden crate bound in wire abandoned at the gate. When she opened it she found Pedro, a young and malnourished jaguar cub. Now he is a strong, healthy adult and the ‘Bello’ of Pilpintuwasi.

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New Arrivals at Pilpintuwasi

    Even though we were only expecting 10 capuchin monkeys to arrive at Pilpintuwasi, in the end the number of new arrivals increased to 38. These animals have all been exploited and are products of illegal animal trafficking and, before coming to Pilpintuwasi, had never seen or experienced their natural habitat. We now have 9 black capuchins which are all young males and have been rescued from different places all over Peru. Their names are David, Mark, Neko, Pedrito, Loquito, Dr. Mel, Otto, Valentino and Wally. Julio, a young black capuchin that has been in Pilpintuwasi for longer, has also been…

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News April 2015

It has been a very busy month at Pilpintuwasi, getting everything ready before our new animals to arrive. All the last bits and pieces are being done and soon we will let you know how our new monkeys are doing in their new homes.         Meanwhile, all our other animals are doing just fine! Chibolo the tapir seems to like his new home very much, Harry the ocelot enjoys her walks in the jungle in the company of our volunteers and finally, Felix, our teenage red uakari monkey has fallen in love with our volunteer Carrie! So,…

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Food for the Animals

Pgymy Marmoset

Questions frequently arrive about caring for our animals and how we use funds so here’s a quick overview. Details and cost of feeding the animals are detailed on our Contributions and Sponsorships pages. Breeding food for many of the animals is problematic as our monkeys are free and it would mean more labor and potential veterinarian problems (along with fees), so ultimately it would probably not be less expensive than buying food. We breed meal worms (Tenebrios) for some of the animals who need substantial protein in their diet. Fortunately, some of our project is self-sustaining, i.e. plants needed for…

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From World Port Source

Moto Taxis.

The Port of Iquitos’ Pilpintuwasi Butterfly Farm and Amazon Animal Orphanage is a unique experience. The owner, Gudrun Sperrer, is devoted to winged beauties and the animals of the Amazon forests. The farm has 42 species of butterfly as well as the leaves, flowers, and fruits they need to live. In addition to butterflies, the farm is home to many “orphaned” jungle animals that Gudrun has adopted to save them. The animals include Pedro Bello, a jaguar a man was trying to sell for a pet; Rosa the Giant Anteater; Chavo the endangered species red-faced Uacary; black Huacary monkeys Zeke…

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From Our Visitors

Chavo Swinging Through the Trees TravBuddy.com: Pilpintuwasi’s primary work is the butterfly program but they also care for several varieties of monkeys, a tapir, a jaguar, an anteater and other the animals. Each of them is well cared for and each has a name. Many of them are endangered species. The butterfly project involves watching over the life cycle of the butterfly from egg to full fledged butterfly before they are released into the wild. There were more varieties than I could count and it was neat to be surrounded by them in the enclosure and to see them at…

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The Traveling Scholar

Notes from a The Traveling Scholar during his visit to Pilpintuwasi and the Animal Orphanage in 2013. In addition to checking out Belen Market and exploring Iquitos, we ventured off to explore  Pilpintuwasi. The orphanage is located a fair distance from the central part of Iquitos and involved a ride in a tuk tuk, followed by a 25 minute ride (at least) by boat to the farm’s entry point. Owl Butterfly As soon as we reached the entry way, we were greeted by howler monkeys and macaws and handed over a reasonable sum (S/. 20 each) to begin exploring the grounds. Unlike a…

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History of Iquitos

Iquitos (Listeni/ɪkɪtɵs/) is the largest city in the Peruvian rainforest and the fifth-largest city of Peru. It is also the capital city of the Loreto Region and Maynas Province. Located in the Amazon Basin, the city borders the Amazon, Nanay and Itaya rivers. Its name in Iquito language translates to “the people.” Many mansions are decorated with exquisitely painted ceramic tiles imported from Portugal, and with mahogany shipped to Italy to be carved by skilled Italian artists, then shipped back to Iquitos. The city proper with its four districts has a population of 422,055; 462,783 live within the Iquitos Metropolitan Area,…

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Notes for Volunteers

Pgymy Marmoset

From Gratuitous Giving’s website: This is a cool volunteer opportunity for those interested in ecology and conservation. Live in the jungle with some really amazing animals! The Amazon Animal Orphanage & Pilpintuwasi Butterfly Farm is near the largest city in the Peruvian Amazon – Iquitos. It’s a rescue and temporary orphanage for wildlife which houses animals in a semi-captive environment. Here are some of the volunteer tasks: Volunteers help with guiding tours of the facility, in English and any other languages you may speak. There are many varied tasks to do for the animals everyday- feeding the monkeys every morning, making monkey…

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Thanks To Our Donors

Sabine and Klaus Marion: Friends from Germany who helped us with moving the manatee to the Orphanage Mrs. Demeter Kraanj, Poland Dianne Levy: In honor of family and friends Alan and Janine: Volunteers from England (Image right, below, feeding the tapir.) Girls on Top from Australia: Jade, Emma and Saffy, who established and stocked a gift shop for Pilpintuwasi. Take a few minutes to read their story of their visit to the Orphanage and Pilpintuwasi. Dreessen, Kris: The Friends Project: While working with scientists in the Yavari/Loreto region, a $50 donation to help care for a baby howler monkey. Guy…

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